The Irish in America

Check this out…

2 Comments

I was recently introduced to a great genealogy blog via Twitter…

Kevin’s Irish Research  is a blog by Kevin McCormack (same name, no relation) from County Cork, Ireland. He is tracing his roots and bringing readers along on the journey. The blog highlights his own research, as well as tips for conducting research in Ireland. His latest post shows how Irish newspapers can provide clues on the origins of the Irish in America.

I appreciate Kevin’s perspective as he is an Irish person in Ireland researching his Irish roots. I particularly enjoyed Kevin’s post on his trip back to his great-grandfather’s birthplace – click here to link directly to the post.

Check this blog out…it is worth a visit!

Advertisements

Author: Aine

I live in Saint Paul, Minnesota. My heritage pretty much covers the map of Ireland: great-great-grandparents from Cork (Crowley, Foley, Regan), a great-great-grandmother from Clare (Quinn), a great-great-grandfather from Fermanagh (McMahon) and his wife's parents from Mayo (McAndrew), a great-grandmother from Connemara (Hannon) married to my great-grandfather from Laois (McCormack), great-grandparents from Sligo (Flannery), and a great-grandmother from Kildare (Hill). All of those people ended up in Minnesota, where my four grandparents were born. Three and four generations after my people left Ireland for America, I retain all Irish heritage. So much for the melting pot...

2 thoughts on “Check this out…

  1. Do you know what areas of Co Cork yours came from? I live in Co Cork.

    All three surnames are good Cork names.

    • My Foley and Regan g-g-grandfathers were from Kilmichael Parish (townlands of Ballina, Mountmusic, Clashbredane). The Lenihan name is associated with the Foleys through marriage – the Lenihans emigrated and settled in New Hampshire about ten years before Patrick Foley (my g-g-grandfather) came. Patrick Foley could read and write and served as a town clerk and as an officer in several organizations. I have baptism info, but nothing else from Ireland.

What do you think? Leave a comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s